Outer Planet Satellites












    Satellites of Jupiter


    Jupiter hosts a complex system of moons, numbering near 80 satellites. Those that have not assigned official IAU names are designated by S/YYYY JXX where XX indicates the order of discovery within the specified year.

    Observations of the Jovian satellites were obtained with Voyager 1 & 2 flybys, Galileo orbiter, Cassini flyby, New Horizons flyby and Juno orbiter.

    Voyager 1 & 2

    Imaging observations of the jovian system were obtained from January to July 1979. Maps are available. The attached indices provide an assessment of available data and can be used to indicate which intervals of data from other instruments may be useful in understanding a satellite and its environment.
    Galileo

    Imaging observations of the jovian system were obtained from June 1996 to November 1997. Maps are available. The attached indices provide an assessment of available data and can be used to indicate which intervals of data from other instruments may be useful in understanding a satellites and its environment.

    NIMS data is available in the imaging node for Callisto, Europa, Ganymede and Io.

    UVS gouv_0002 contains data from orbits G1 to E11 (the primary mission). Raw data from E12 through I33, the extended mission, are stored on gouv_0003.

    PPR data are contained in 2 volumes – gopr-5001 contains raw and reduced data from orbits G1 to E11 (the primary mission). Data from E12 through I33, the extended mission, are stored on gopr_5002. The Data Files are ASCII tables with supporting PDS3 labels.

    Cassini

    Cassini-Huygens made its closest approach to Jupiter at a distance of 6.2 million miles (10 million kilometers) on Dec 30, 2000. Observations of the planet, rings, and moons were made during the months before and after this date. Images were obtained from Oct 1, 2000 to Mar 22, 2001 with IR and UV observations in the interval. All Cassini instruments except Radio Science and the Ion/Neutral Mass Spectrometer participated in the Jupiter flyby, which was categorized as an engineering exercise, placing strong constraints on the team.

    The attached indices provide an assessment of available data and can be used to indicate which intervals of data from other instruments may be useful in understanding a satellite and its environment.


    New Horizons

    For a 4-month period centered on 28 Feb 2007 a jovian observational campaign was carried out and the data were officially archived in the PDS Small Bodies node. The flyby passed within 2.3X106 KM (32 jovian radii), moving at 21 km/sec.

    See the New Horizons help page and the attached indices provide an assessment of available data and can be used to indicate which intervals of data from other instruments may be useful in understanding a satellites and its environment.

    ALICE – A UV Imaging spectrograph - Ganymede, Europa, Io
    Multispectral Visible Imaging Camera (MVIC/RALPH) - Callisto, Ganymede, Europa, Io
    Linear Etalon Image Spectral Array (LEISA/RALPH) - Callisto, Ganymede, Europa, Io
    Long Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI) - Callisto, Ganymede, Europa, Io, Himalia, Elara


    Solar Wind and Energetic particle data are house in the PPI node

    Juno (in progress)


    See main help page - Satellite data has been acquired by JIRAM and a satellite working group has been set up to meet on Sept 5.



    Satellites of Saturn


    The Cassini Icy Satellite page provides a summary of Saturnian Satellites. Additional information on the outer satellites is available at https://tilmanndenk.de/outersaturnianmoons/. Also see Denk, T. and Mottola, S, Studies of Irregular Satellites: I. Lightcurves and rotation periods of 25 Saturnian moons from Cassini Observations, Icarus, vol 322, pages 80 -102

    Observations of the Saturnian satellites were obtained with Voyager 1 & 2 flybys and Cassini orbiter.

    Voyager 1 & 2


    Imaging observations of the saturnian system were obtained from August 1980 to September 1981. Maps are available. The attached indices provide an assessment of available data and can be used to indicate which intervals of data from other instruments may be useful in understanding a satellite and its environment.



    See the Voyager Saturn Data archive page for access to the data



    Cassini


    Extensive help pages that were generated by the Cassini Mission are available. They include the main page - Cassini Mission Archive Home, the Icy Satellite page - Cassini Icy Satellites, Enceladus, and Other Moons, and the Titan page - Cassini Titan Science.



    Satellites of Uranus

    Five satellites (Oberon, Titania, Ariel, Umbriel and Miranda) were known before the Voyager 2 flyby. Ten more ( Juliet, Puck, Cordelia, Ophelia, Bianca, Desdemona, Portia, Rosalind, Cressida and Belinda) were identified by Voyager.

    Voyager 1 & 2

    Imaging observations of the uranian system were obtained from Nov 1985 through February 1986. Maps are available. The attached indices provide an assessment of available data and can be used to indicate which intervals of data from other instruments may be useful in understanding a satellite and its environment.

    See the Voyager Uranus Data archive page for access to the data




    Before the Voyager 2 flyby only 2 moons of Neptune were known. Detailed planning was done for Triton, the largest moon - discovered in 1846 and Nereid - found in 1949. Six more dark moons were discovered by Voyager 2 (Proteus, Halimede, Sao, Psamathe, Laomedeia, and Neso).

    Imaging observations by Voyager 2 of the Triton were obtained from 1989-06-07 to 1989-09-05 and for Nereid from 1989-06-08 to 1989-08-29. Maps are available and attached indices provide an assessment of available imaging data that can be used to indicate which intervals of data from other instruments may be useful in understanding a satellite and its environment.



    Satellites of Pluto


    Pluto has 5 moons; Charon - discovered in 1978, Nix and Hydra - found in 2005 with Hubble Space Telescope, Kerberos - discovered in 2011, and Styx - discovered in 2012 during a hazard search.

    Observations by New Horizons of Pluto and his moons were obtained from 2015-06-16T17:20:29 to 2015-07-18T00:39. Surface composition and geographic maps are available and the attached indices provide an assessment of available remote sensing data that can be used to indicate which intervals of data from other instruments may be useful in understanding the satellites and their environment.

    ALICE ULTRAVIOLET IMAGING SPECTROGRAPH (ALICE) - Charon, Hydra and Nix
    LINEAR ETALON IMAGING SPECTRAL ARRAY (LEISA) - Charon, Hydra, Kerberos and Nix
    LONG RANGE RECONNAISSANCE IMAGER (LORRI) - Charon, Hydra, Kerberos, Nix and Styx
    MULTISPECTRAL VISIBLE IMAGING CAMERA (MVIC) - Charon, Hydra, Kerberos, Nix
    RADIO SCIENCE EXPERIMENT (REX) - Charon

    Pluto Energetic Particle Spectrometer (PEPSSI) and Solar Wind Around Pluto instrument (SWAP) data are available a the Planetary Plasma Interactions Node